To Schedule an Inspection Call: (248) 595-7060

Radon Testing

radon mi

Concerned about Radon Gas?

Axiom Home Inspection offers testing for Radon gas.

Here in Michigan we are have all (3) Radon Zones as listed to the right. Surveys conducted by the Michigan Department of Public Health Indoor Radon Program (now the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Indoor Radon Program) indicate that about 12% of the homes in Michigan are in excess of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency's action level of 4.0 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). In some counties, as many as 40-45% of the homes may have levels exceeding that guideline. The only way to tell if a home has elevated levels of radon is to have the home tested. This is easy to do and there are many testing companies and home inspectors who offer radon measurement services. Look for individuals certified by the National Environmental Health Association (NEHA) or the National Radon Safety Board (NRSB). 

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas.

You can't see radon. And you can't smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home.

Radon is estimated to cause many thousands of deaths each year. That's because when you breathe air containing radon, you can get lung cancer. In fact, the Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States today. Only smoking causes more lung cancer deaths. If you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.

Radon can be found all over the U.S.

Radon comes from the natural (radioactive) breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water and gets into the air you breathe. Radon can be found all over the U.S. It can get into any type of building — homes, offices, and schools — and result in a high indoor radon level. But you and your family are most likely to get your greatest exposure at home, where you spend most of your time.

You should test for radon.

Testing is the only way to know if you and your family are at risk from radon. EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third floor for radon. EPA also recommends testing in schools.

Testing is inexpensive and easy — it should only take a few minutes of your time. Millions of Americans have already tested their homes for radon (see How to Test Your Home).

You can fix a radon problem.

Radon reduction systems work and they are not too costly. Some radon reduction systems can reduce radon levels in your home by up to 99%. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable levels.

How Does Radon Get Into Your Home?

Any home may have a radon problem

Radon is a radioactive gas. It comes from the natural decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils. It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation. Your home traps radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have a radon problem. This means new and old homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements.

Radon from soil gas is the main cause of radon problems. Sometimes radon enters the home through well water (see "Radon in Water" below). In a small number of homes, the building materials can give off radon, too. However, building materials rarely cause radon problems by themselves.

Radon Entry points:

 radon entry

There are two general ways to test your home for radon:

Because radon levels vary from day to day and from season to season, a short-term test is less likely than a long-term test to tell you your year-round average radon level. However, if you need results quickly, a short-term test may be used to decide whether to fix the home.

Short-Term Testing:

The quickest way to test is with short-term tests. Short-term tests remain in your home from two days to 90 days, depending on the device. There are two groups of devices which are more commonly used for short-term testing. The passive-device group includes alpha-track detectors, charcoal canisters, charcoal liquid scintillation detectors, and electret ion chambers. The active device group consists of different types of continuous monitors.

Whether you test for radon yourself, or hire a state-certified tester or a privately certified tester, all radon tests should be taken for a minimum of 48 hours. A longer period of testing is required for some devices.

Long-Term Testing:

Long-term tests remain in your home for more than 90 days. Alpha-track and electret ion chamber detectors are commonly used for this type of testing. A long-term test will give you a reading that is more likely to tell you your home's year-round average radon level than a short-term test. If time permits, long-term tests (more than 90 days) can be used to confirm initial short-term results. When long-term test results are 4 pCi/L or higher, the EPA recommends mitigating the home.

Our service areas

service area 2

Axiom Home Inspection is based in Southeast Oakland county, making us centrally located for the Metro Detroit Area. We inspect homes in Oakland, Macomb, and Wayne counties.

Please give us a call even if you're outside this area. We will make every effort to accommodate you and your inspection needs. All clients should have the opportunity to receive a quality inspection.

Contact